About your Search

20130101
20130131
STATION
CSPAN 9
CSPAN2 5
CNNW 2
CNN 1
FBC 1
LANGUAGE
English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the government already provided grants to battery companies, and lastly another one went bankrupt, a 123 battery company. compact power run by lg -- battery company that is laying off workers. i'm not sure the government has a role. as far as natural gas goes, gm and chrysler have announced, gm and ford have announced they will be making dual fuel pickup trucks using natural gas and gasoline, and many fleet of trucks, and buses now run on natural gas. .. the wrong technology will be a drain of the taxpayer and will add to our trillion dollar deficit. [inaudible question] >> thank you. i would like to know, to which to greedy peak says the united nations look in that 21st century that has contributed to the conservation of political power in the hands of the green lobby? >> well, un has always been very encouraging of the green lobby, and this green jobs issue is not just an issue here in the that states but the issue also in europe, being encouraged by the u.n., meetings in real over the summer, but europe is also finding that green jobs are not all they thought there would be. spain has just st
. then lastly, i have to say that this is a story of guilty love. which i'll come back to if you ask me. what's the book really about? all right. let me give you the main points here. i'll keep it brief because the basic structure the skelton of the book is quickly told. it's a analysis. it cull man nates in a prediction. this industry, which is now at this moment, the world's largest oil producer because the saudis have tholgds back. they play tag with one another. they alternate and -- for who is the world's largest oil producer. russias at the moment are a hit. they moved up very slightly to very nearly the soviet level of production. meanwhile the saudis have battles back in order to moderate the -- as a matter of fact why are they like that? we request come back to that. so anyway, there we have the russians who are the number one oil producers. but they have essentially been coasting on the asset inherited from the soviet union from another time and another place. and such was the wealthy of what was discovered such was the wealth of what is still producing 60% of russian oil production
? how was that done? so you'll find there's a chapter on that side of the story. and then lastly, i have to say that this is a story of guilty love. [laughter] which i'll come back to if you ask me. so what's the book really about? all right. let me give you the main points here, and i'll keep this brief because the basic structure, the skeleton of the book is something that's quickly told, and it's basically an analysis that culminates in a prediction. this industry which is now at this moment the world's large oil producer because the saudis have throttled back, the saudis and the russians played tag with one another -- they alternate as to who's the world's largest oil producer. the russians at this moment are ahead. they have moved up very slightly to very nearly the soviet level of production. meanwhile, the saudis have throttled back in order to moderate the -- well, why are they, as a matter of fact? why are they throttling? we can come back to that. so anyway, you have the russians who are the number one oil producers, but they have essentially been coasting on the assets inherit
'll find there is a chapter on that side of the story. and then lastly i have to say that this is a story of guilty love, which i'll come back to if you ask me. so what's the book really about? all right. let me give you the main points here, and i'll keep this brief because the basic structure, the skeleton of the book is something that's quickly told, and it's basically an analysis. it culminates in a prediction. this industry which is now at this moment the world's largest oil producer because the saudis have throttled back, so the saudis and the russians play tag with one another, they alternate, they vie with one another over who is the world's largest oil producer. the russians at this moment are ahead. they have moved up very slightly to very near the soviet level of production. meanwhile, the saudis have throttled back in order to moderate the -- well, why are they, as a matter of fact? why are they throttling back? we can come back to that. so anyway, there we have the russians who are the number one oil producers. but they have essentially been coasting on the assets inherited f
humanity that it has to cure. lastly, wake up to the idea that the iranians themselves have told us what a intend in a nuclear exchange. again, the president said, the application of an atomic bomb would not leave anything in israel. the same thing would just produce damages in the muslim world. in other words, israel would forever and instantly be wiped off the map, whereas the muslim nation of 1.8 billion people would indoor with some damage. endure with some damage. y that itssly applie worked in the past, it will work in the future is unwarranted. we are assured by the other side that deterrence will work. they do not know, and we do not know if it will work or not. imagine the risk if they are wrong. 6 million jews are dead. the eradication of israel. hyper proliferation in the middle east and iranian domination of the middle east and the oil economy of the world. do any of you want to live with that? thank you very much. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, it is clear why people have called this debate one of the toughest global foreign-policy challenges of a generation. the have h
. the saudis would line the deserts with arrows saying this way. lastly, i'm running out of time, i hope, perhaps you will resist from applauding at six-minute mark, or at least the 60% who are not sympathetic to our view and drown out the others. this is a regime that has threatened to annihilate israel and expressed its intentions to do so. we are relying on deterrence because it worked in the cold war. the cold war was different. the target of the united states was a continental nation, israel is a one bomb country. [cheers and applause] i commend you. i will stop here and say there is a radical difference between the soviet -- u.s. relationship. you will not ask jews in israel to rely on deterrence in this kind of situation. thank you very much. >> charles, if it makes you better henry kissinger re did not get away with it either. >> thank you for that introduction. it is a -- introduction it is a pleasure being here. it goes without saying that the world would be better if iran does not become a nuclear arms state. achieving that goal should be our principle priority going forward.
-libya sanctions act. and lastly, in 2001, you were one of four senators who refused to sign the letter supporting israel. are those accurate? >> well, let's start with the -- >> no. i just want to know if the statement -- these are votes that took place. do you agree those votes took place? >> i want to ask the letter that you just noted in your fifth point, what was the date in the letter? >> the date. >> you said i refused to sign letter. >> october of 2001. >> a letter to -- >> ok. skip that one. is the other ones true? >> well, it was fairly important -- >> it's very important. i was holding the letter at the time that we were gathering signatures. >> i see. on the 2008 question regarding designating the revolutionary guard as a terrorist organization, i did vote against it. >> i'm sorry. i don't want to be rude. you and i are very good friends. i know my time's going to expire. others are going to ask why you did this. i was asking for the accuracy. if you don't want to answer that's fine. >> i did vote against it and i was going to explain why i voted against it. >> i know. they will be ask
the saudis would line the desert with directional arrows saying this way to tehran. now, lastly, and i'm running out of time. i hope perhaps you'll desist from applauding at the six minute mark or at least the 60% of you who aren't sympathetic to our view -- who are sympathetic to our view and drown out the others. is that this is a regime that has threatened to inile late israel and express its intentions to do so. we are our -- we have to rely on deterrence because it worked on the cold war. it was radically different. it was not existential. and the target the united states was a continental nation of great size israel is a one-bomb country. that's a very strong 27% i commend you on your energy there. i will stop here and say there's a radical difference between the soviet-u.s. relationship and relationship of israel and iran. and you will not ask 6 million jews in israel to rely on their existence on deterrents in this kind of situation. thank you very much. >> charles if i would it would make you feel any better henry kissinger didn't get away with it, either. >> good evening. tha
, it turns out a lot of us just do not bother. lastly, "madman" are coming back. the premiere day will be sunday, april 7. two hours at 9:00 o'clock eastern. cheryl: am i the only person in this building that has never watched that show? dennis: it is because you are home reading. [ laughter ] cheryl: no, i am out running. the fact that dvr viewing is actually boosting the numbers. they are bringing in more revenue. dennis: maybe they will find a good deal. cheryl: there is this before we go to commercial break. it is basically the hottest ride on the road right now. it will be a hotspot. bentley is equipping its sedan with wireless internet that can handle up to eight devices. eight devices in your car. totally safe for everyone peered with just a touch of a button. allowing passengers to use ipads, wireless keyboards. there are 8-inch flat screens with build in dvd players. they will make their debut this march at the geneva auto show. because we all need to do more things while we drive. right. dennis: you do not want to miss tomorrow show. i will have an exclusive interview wi
would line the desert with directional ar o'o's saying -- arrows saying this way to tehran. now, lastly, and i'm running out of time, i hope perhaps you'll resist from applauding at the six-minute mark or at least the 60% of who you are sympathetic to our view. [laughter] drown out the others. is that this is a regime that has threatened to anye light israel and expressed -- annihilate israel and has expressed its intention to do so. we have to rely on deterrence because it worked in the cold war. the cold war was radically different. the soviets had an ideological argument with the united states. it was not ex stention. and the target. united states was a continental nation of great size. israel is a one-bomb country. [applause] that's a very strong 27th -- 27%. i commend you on your energy. i will stop here and say there's a radical difference between the soviet-u.s. relationship and the relationship with israel and iran and you will not ask six million jews in israel to rely for their existence on deterrence in this kind of situation. thank you very much. [applause] >> if it makes yo
employer or position or perhaps it's something down the road. >> lastly -- unlike the unhappy guys in the movie office space, embrace all sorts of technology. >> by the year 2020, over 75% of jobs will have a technology component. i think that's important for people to understand for longevity and employment of the future. >> staying employed this year will be easier in some fields than in others. for example, jobs in health care and business services like sales are expected to be plentiful. as 2013 goes on, the job market is predicted to pick up steam. setting the stage for better days in the next new year. cnn, washington. >> preparing to fly a plane to new york is pulled from the cockpit for smelling like alcohol. we are following the development. stay with us. you are in "the situation room." s customer satisfaction is at 97%. mmmm tasty. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make these geico adverts. so we're taking you behind the scenes. this coffee cup, for example, is computer animated. it's not real. geico's customer satisfaction is quite real though. this
. >> let me just lastly mention, you mentioned darfur in your opening comments. the humantarian crisis was so severe. we still have concerns in the southern and blue nile south sudan still has problems. burma where we had hope in november, there has not been progress made. i hope that you will make these areas where there is -- humanitarian crises a highest priority to try to protect the safety of the people that live in these areas. >> i will. i intend to do that. first of all the president, i think, will continue to -- with an appointment of the special envoy to the sudan, we just had princeton lyman, who's done a great job under tough circumstances. i was there myself during the course of their referendum on the independence. i have met with their president many times. i met not with bashir but people underneath him in the north. and my hope is that we can get the status of the number of components of the c.p.a. that were not fulfilled finally fulfilled. by nile, and others are human tragedy. the bombings are continuing. starvation taking place. displacement. and in some ways darfur
that will prevent identity theft and end the hiring of future unauthorized workers and lastly, we establish an improved process for admitting future workers to serve our nation's work force needs while simultaneously protecting all workers. other bipartisan groups and senators have stood in the same spot before, trumpeting similar proposals, but we believe this will be the year congress finally gets it done. the politics on this issue have been turned upside down. for the first time ever, there's more political risk in opposing immigration reform than in supporting it. we believe we have a window of opportunity to act, but we will only succeed if the effort is bipartisan. by their presence today, my republican colleagues are making a significant statement about the need to fix our broken immigration system. we democrats are equally serious. we do not want immigration as a wedge issue. much father, we want a bipartisan bill that solves the problem and becomes law. we recognize that in order to pass bipartisan legislation, none of us can get everything we want. that's why our frame work says
to the administration. lastly, i will say that the administration has other people who are on their side, people like pastor coat who was in the gay movement and opening that up that they could turn to for the inaugural prayer. >> ari, let's talk a little bit about the vice president and his task force on guns right now. here's the question. he's obviously going to come up with his recommendations by tuesday. with every day that passes, since the newtown massacre, does the chances of real substantive gun control legislation fade, get weaker? >> i don't think so. i think newtown is so searing in people's minds that this has a longer lasting factor than most shootings previously. there was another shooting today, as you saw, wolf, and this one involved a shotgun. i think it still raises the question, do any of us know how to stop these shootings from taking place? are we going to ban shotguns now? like the sentiment is to ban assault rifles. i think we're still going to grapple with this. i hope it's balanced. i hope it's not just gun control and taking advantage of newtown. we do need to do something
for the jobs of the future. lastly, on your question regarding what is the magic plan out there on how to solve the debt -- i don't think there is one. i think it is going to take all of us working together with the president to come up with the balanced approach. no one person, i think, has the answer. and it is going to require all of us coming to the table, debating these issues in ways that keep the people of this country at the forefront and coming up with the best answer possible to move our country forward. host: on twitter -- as you were ben wants to know how the housing industry is doing in nevada. guest: nevada lead the nation in the house of foreclosure and my -- was bump worst hit. the city of north las vegas we have the highest rate of home foreclosures in the country for some time. now, good news, our home values are beginning to creep back up. there is a report out this week that said home values will continue to increase in 2013. but the problem right now is those who bought their homes who did not lose them to foreclosure, nearly 60 percent of them in southern nevada are underw
. the saudis would line the zerts with arrows saying this way. lastly, i'm running out of time, i hope, perhaps you will resist from applauding at six-minute mark, or at least the 60% who are not sympathetic to our view and drown out the others. this is a regime that has threaten to annihilate israel and expressed its intentions to do so. we are relying on deterrence because it worked in the cold war. the cold war was different. the target of the united states was a tenl nation, israel is a one bomb country. [cheers and applause] i commend you. i will stop here and say there is a radical difference between the soviet -- u.s. relationship. you will not ask jews in israel to rely on deterrence in this kind of situation. thank you very much. >> charles, if it makes you better henry kissinge re did not get away with it either. >> thank you for that intro duction. it is a -- introduction it is a pleasure being here. it goes without saying that the world would be better if iran does not become a nuclear arms state. achieving that goal should be our principle priority going forward. however, despite o
? and isn't the federal prisons growing out of more rapid -- >> yes. >> and lastly, will the federal establishment be as sensitive to the economic issues as the states are? >> yeah, no, that's an important set of questions. i don't talk about the federal system as much because they are on the opposite trajectory. so the federal system, as was just mentioned, is actually expanding. the bureau of prisons' budget actually expanded this past, this past year. it is going kind of countercounter to the that the states are going in. and the aclu recently sponsored a couple of hearings in congress where state leaders from states that actually have enacted significant reform presented the story of what had happened in their states and trying to kind of poet sate reform in the federal -- motivate reform in the federal system. the reality is that the economic pressures facing the states and state governments don't exist in the same way as they do with the federal government. so the federal government isn't feeling that same pinch. they -- state governments have to balance their budget. the feder
would line the desert with directional arrows saying this way to tehran. lastly and i'm running out of time i hope perhaps you'll resist from applauding at the six-minute mark or at least the 60% of you who are sympathetic to our view, drown out the others, is that this is a regime that has threatened to annihilate israel and expressed its intention to do so. we are relying on deterrence because it worked in the cold war. the cold war was different. the target of the united states was a continental nation, israel is a one bomb country. [cheers and applause] i commend you. i will stop here and say there is a radical difference between the soviet -- u.s. relationship. you will not ask jews in israel to rely on deterrence in this kind of situation. thank you very much. >> charles, if it makes you better henry kissinger re did not get away with it either. >> thank you for that introduction. it is a -- introduction it is a pleasure being here. it goes without saying that the world would be better if iran does not become a nuclear arms state. achieving that goal should be our principle pr
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)